Lidia Jones





Interviewer: Mrs. Bernice Bowden

Person interviewed: Lidia Jones

228 N. Oak Street, Pine Bluff, Arkansas

Age: 94

Occupation: None--blind





"I was born in Mississippi and emigrated to Arkansas. Born on the

Peacock place. Old John Patterson was my old master.



"My first goin' out was to the cow pen, then to the kitchen, and then

they moved me to Mrs. Patterson's dining-room.



"I helped weave cloth. Dyed it? I wish you'd hush! My missis went to

the woods and got it. All I know is, she said it was indigo. She had a

great big kittle and she put her thread in that. No Lord, she never

bought her indigo--she raised it.



"Oh, Miss Fannie could do most anything. Made the prettiest

counter-panes I ever saw. Yes ma'am, she could do it and did do it.



"She had a loom half as big as this house. Lord a mercy, a many a time

I went dancin' from that old spinnin'-wheel.



"They made all the clothes for the colored folks. They'd be sewin' for

weeks and months.



"Miss Fannie and Miss Frances--that was her daughter--they wove such

pretty cloth for the colored. You know, they went and made themselves

dresses and the white and colored had the same kind of dresses.



"Yes Lord, they had some folks.



"Miss Frances wore hoops but Miss Fannie didn't.



"During of the War them Yankees come down the river; but to tell the

truth, we run and hid and never seen 'em no more.



"They took Mars John's fine saddle horse named Silver Heels. Yes

ma'am, took saddle and bridle and the horse on top of 'em. And he had

a mare named Buchanan and they took her too. He had done moved out of

the big house down into the woods. Called hisself hidin' I reckon. And

he had his horses tied down by the river and the Yankees slipped up on

him and took the horses.



"Yankees burned his house and gin house too and set fire to the

cotton. Oh Lord, I don't like to talk about it. Them Yankees was

rough.



"Right after freedom our white folks left this country and went to

Missouri and the last account I heard of 'em they was all dead.



"After freedom, folks scattered out just like sheep.



"I'm tryin' to study 'bout some songs but I can't think of nothin' but

Dixie."





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