Maria Cleland





Project 1885-1

FOLKLORE

Spartanburg Dist. 4

May 24, 1937

Edited by:

Elmer Turnage



STORIES FROM EX-SLAVES





"I was born near old Bush River Baptist Church, in Newberry County, S.

C. I was the slave of John Satterwhite. My mother lived with them. I was

a small girl when the war was on. My brother went to war with Marse

Satterwhite. When de Ku Klux and paddrollers traveled around in that

section, they made Mr. Satterwhite hold the niggers when they was

whipped, but he most all the time let them loose, exclaiming, 'they got

loose'--he did not want many of them whipped.



"My mother had a kitchen way off from the house, wid a wide fireplace

where she cooked victuals. There was holes in back of de chimney with

iron rods sticking out of them to hold de pans, pots, kettles or

boilers.



"People there did not believe much in ghosts. They were not much

superstitious, but one time some of the negroes thought they heard the

benches in Bush River Baptist Church turn over when nobody was in the

church.



"Negroes most always shouted at their religious meetings. Before de

negroes had their own church meetings, the slaves went to the white

folks' Bush River Baptist church and set up in the gallery. I moved to

Newberry when I was young, after I got married."



Source: Maria Cleland, Newberry, S. C. (80 years old).

Interviewer: G. L. Summer, Newberry, S. C. (5/17/37)





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